How to increase your productivity as a Web Designer

Understanding and working closely with your client is the key to being a successful web designer. Increasing your productivity means doing a good job for your client and gaining more business in the long run. Being productive in any client-based role requires understanding their needs.

Particularly for web design, it is crucial that those business models are clear enough to the designer that they can be translated into a visual brand for the client. As a website is the first port of call for many new and existing clients, it is vital that their website is designed to be functional, user-friendly, efficient, clear and interactive.

Consider these tips for how to increase your productivity as a web designer:

increaseyourproductivity

  • Meet with your clients regularly to keep the project on track. Update them on plans you have for their project and how your time is progressing against the estimate you have provided. Having regular meetings will help to keep the client’s vision clear and on track so that the finished product is ready to ‘go live’ as soon as possible with only minimal tweaking.
  • Use your most successfully completed projects as shining examples of your best work. Advertise these on your own website as advertisements for potential clients of what your web design looks like. Present a range of designs that are most representative of the work you do so that your client can get a feel for your strengths. You will gain potential clients by including a feedback page of testimonials of previous satisfied clients. Ask your clients for recommendations for your website.
  • Keep Your Own Website Pristine. Develop, update and flourish your own website regularly. Nothing sells your web design business to potential clients more than having a fantastic website of your own to display you latest skills, talents and features of your designs.
  • Grow Your Brand. Promote your business logo on the websites of clients whose pages you have developed. This will lead new clients in your direction. Keeping your brand and your website current and modern gives the impression you are an innovative business and able to undertake challenging new projects. Other things you can do to grow your brand include networking with local business groups like the Chamber of Commerce, and being active on social media.
  • Assess how you keep track of your time. Are you projects staying to schedule or do you regularly go over budget and the allowed timeframes? Consider whether job management software will work to improve your business. Working out your weekly schedule to fit in all your projects will help to make better use of your time and fit in more clients.
  • Work to your design strengths. Let your work grow from your strongest design skills. Be open to suggestions that suit your clients, and don’t be afraid to up-skill to meet their needs. Take on new clients whose requirements challenge you and stretch your business. These are the opportunities that will help you grow as a web designer.

Be innovative, daring, modern and competitive with your approach to marketing yourself as a web designer. Consider what you can do to reach out to new clients to expand the productivity of your business.

WorkflowMax is a cloud-based software tool that will take the pain out of running your business. A total solution covering all operations from prospecting to quoting, time sheeting to invoicing and everything in between. Ideal for creatives, agencies, consultants, professional services, IT, and trades – if your business is job focused then WorkflowMax is the tool you need.

Mars Cureg

Web designer by profession, photography hobbyist, T-shirt lover, design blog founder, gamer. Socially and physically awkward, lack of social skills, struggles to communicate with anyone who doesn't have a keyboard. Willing to walk to get to the promised land. Photo and video freelancer, SEO. Check out more on my Google+

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